The Rabbit King: Kingdom Leporidae
Jim McEnroe www.therabbitking.com
Book Review - Answers

 

The Rabbit King

 

Kingdom Leporidae

  

The story of The Orphan Hare . . .

who became king!

  

Book Review -  Teacher's Guide   

English Edition

 

 

Answers

 

Jim McEnroe

All Rights Reserved

www.therabbitking.com 

  

Answers Suggested by the Author

 

1) Why was Hare feeling hopeless and sad in the beginning of the story?

         From:

a)     Loneliness and despair: He was The Orphan Hare.

b)      Eating unhealthy food and lack of exercise.

c)      A bad attitude and lack of motivation.

d)     Bad habits replaced good habits ("sweets replaced the carrots").

e)     Experiencing loss, but never winning.

f)      All further enforced by dwelling (thinking) on his "negative" past.

Pages 2, 3, 4 

 

2) What text portion, representing a metaphor, relates to Hare's emotional pain on page 2?

      "Blisters on his toes and soul made his hopping stop".

Page 2 * Metaphor: Use of a word or phrase to describe, or represent, something else.

 

3) What motivated Hare to change and start a new life?

a)      Thinking more about his future and less about his past; positive vs. negative thoughts.

b)      Facing his reality and understanding the need for change: "He looked upon his munchies and knew they would not last."

c)      Hope and inspiration.

d)     Having a clear goal and purpose to pursue: Hopping to "The Kingdom" = action.

Pages 4, 5
 
4) What is the significance (meaning/importance) of the text; "he hopped the distance suffering great pain" on page 5?

      Achieving goals take time and are often difficult to achieve.

Page 5

 

5) What personal goals did Hare reach prior to the king discovering him eating his fruits and vegetables on page 6?

a)      A good (satisfying) life.

b)      Control of his life and situation.

c)      Fitness and good health by eating more nutritious and wholesome food.

d)     Becoming educated by reading: "Hare reading a book on page 6".

Page 6

 

6) Why did the king and queen decide to adopt Hare, making him a prince?

a)      Hare's sincere apology when addressing the king: Saying he was sorry and asking for his forgiveness; i.e., expressing humility and humbleness.

b)      The king and queen liked Hare: The Orphan Hare.

c)      The king and queen were childless.

d)     Hare's honesty and wisdom.

Pages 7, 8, 9

 

7) Why did Kristina wear white on her wedding day?

     To show she was pure (high sense of morality) in her thoughts, actions, and behaviors.

     (Suggested by the author - Not found in text).

* Morality (from Latin Moralitas; "manner, character, proper behavior") is a sense of behavioral conduct that differentiate intentions, decisions and actions between those which are good (right) and bad (wrong).

Pages 12

 

8) What is the wedding tradition in the text and illustration on page 13?

             Kristina, The Princess Bride, wearing:

a)      Something old: Perfect blue diamond in pendant

b)      Something new: Gold and diamond bracelet.

c)      Something borrowed: Gold and diamond bracelet - borrowed from the queen.

d)     Something blue: Perfect blue diamond in pendant.

Page 13

 

* Brides have been honoring the tradition of wearing old, new, borrowed, and blue items on their wedding day for centuries.

 

  • Something old represents the link with the bride's family and the past. It is symbolic of continuity.
  • Something new represents good luck, success, and the bride's hopes for a bright future in her new married life.
  • Something borrowed represents loyalty to the bride: That friends and family will be there for her on her special day, and in the future when help may be needed. Anything can be borrowed but it must be returned.
  • Something blue is symbolic of faithfulness, purity and, like something borrowed, loyalty.

9) What is a tricorn?

     The tricorn or tricorne is a three-cornered hat popular during the late 17th & 18th centuries.

Page 14

 

10) What is Royal Rabbit Day?

      The day Prince Hare was crowned the king!

Chapter Three: Pages 16 thru 26

 

11) What is a coronation?

      The act or ceremony of crowning a king.

Pages 16 thru 24

 

12) Many of the symbols of authority and rituals on Royal Rabbit Day described in the text of Chapter Three are based on what?

      Fact not fiction. Much of the text is based on the actual coronation rituals of a European King, including Prince Hare's elevation to knighthood on page 21.

Pages 16 thru 24
 

13) When does the actual crowning of a king take place: At the beginning, middle, or end of a coronation?

      The end of a coronation.

Page 24

 

14) What are the traditional heirlooms presented to a king during an actual coronation?

a)      Scepter

b)      Sword

c)      Shield

d)     Crown

e)      Ring.

Page 17

 

15) What other important "Hareloom" was included with the treasure during the coronation of Prince Hare?

      "The Golden Carrot": The root of all values, virtues, truths and wisdom in The Kingdom Leporidae.

Page 18


16) What is the significance (meaning) of the "emerald clusters" in the text and illustration on page 18?

a)      Emeralds are a symbol of hope, love, reason, and wisdom; the essence of King Hare and The Kingdom Leporidae.

b)      Based on the above: The "sprouting" or "spreading" of the emerald clusters is a great metaphor, which correlates well with the overall theme and moral of the story. 

Page 18
 
17) Leporidae: What does it mean?

      Leporidae [lə′pȯrədē] The family of hares and rabbits (Leporids): Derived from the word "Lepus"; hare in Latin. Subtitle: Kingdom Leporidae = Kingdom of hares and rabbits.

 
18) Where is "The Carrot Oath" engraved?

      On "The Golden Carrot".

Page 19
 
19) What does "The Carrot Oath" and "Royal Rabbit Creed" consist of?

Noble Rabbit Truths: Rabbit values, virtues, truths and wisdom.

a)      Always pursue truth.

b)      Give liberty and life to others.

c)      Keep fresh veggies on reserve.

d)     Other rabbit truths.

Pages 19, 20

 

20) What did Prince Hare become when he was anointed during his coronation on Royal Rabbit Day?

      A knight: Referred to in the text as "Sir Hare" after his elevation to knighthood.

Page 21
 
21) What was Hare presented with when he became a knight?

a)      Sword

b)      Spurs of knighthood.

c)      Bracelets of a lord.

Page 21

 

22) What does a coronation ring represent?

      Ruling a kingdom.

Page 21

 

23) What is the center stone used in a coronation ring since the 13th Century.

      Ruby: Since Henry III (1216-1272).

Page 21:  Illustration reference only.
 
24) What does the "pure sheen" emitting from "the jewel upon the scepter" and "brightest carrot the world had ever seen" represent on page 22?

 King Hare's values and virtues: Kindness, compassion, honesty, integrity, etc.

Page 22
 
25) What did The Coronation Ball make?

      History!

Page 26

 

26) What was Hare's "fairy tale" that came true (became reality) on page 27?

      Being in a position and have the resources to help those in need.

Page 27: Suggested by the author - Not found in text.

 

27) What does kindness mean to you?

Kindness is the act or way of thinking of being kind - that is, the goodness and the behavior of charity, tenderness and sincere concern for others. Kindness is known as one of the greatest virtues and values ​​in most cultures throughout the world.

Page 28

 

28) What does compassion mean to you?

Compassion (from Latin: "co-suffering"), that is, suffering together is considered among the greatest of virtues. Compassion is having a profound awareness of the suffering of others - combined with the desire to alleviate (relieve) it.

Page 28

 

29) What does forgiveness mean to you?

The word "forgive" means to wipe the slate clean, to pardon, to cancel a debt. When we wrong someone, we should desire and seek their forgiveness so the relationship can be restored. Therefore, should we not forgive those who wrong us? We also need to forgive ourselves for the decisions we have made ​​throughout our lives . . . to let go of our past: So we can enjoy the present, be inspired, live our lives without guilt or shame and make better decisions in the future.

Page 28

 

       End of book

 

Other questions for review and discussion.

(Answers suggested by the author - Not found in text)
 
 
30) What is an important "motto" King Hare lives by?

     "The secret to life, more or less, is to think more about the future and less about the past". - King Hare

Motto: A brief statement to express a principle, goal, or ideal.

 
31) What is the story based on?

a)      Imaginative Creation = Fiction (Non-Factual).

b)      Research & Reality = Fact/s (Non-Fiction).

 

32) What was the most important gift the king and queen gave The Orphan Hare when they adopted him?

       The opportunity to achieve his dreams and reach his full potential.

 

33) What is the theme (moral) of the story?
       a) Happy are the hares who find their purpose in life.
         b) Overcoming adversity.
         c) Nobility takes many forms.

        

       Answer: b) Overcoming Adversity.

        * Adversity: A state of hardship, affliction, distress or misfortune.

 

Other comments & notes: Essay?

 

What was the most important thing you learned from the story?

 

 

Questions & Discussion

 

 

Glossary:

 

Coronation: The act or ceremony of crowning a king.

 

Leporidae [lə′pȯrədē] The family of hares and rabbits (Leporids): Derived from the word "Lepus"; hare in Latin. Subtitle: Kingdom Leporidae = Kingdom of hares and rabbits.

'

Metaphor: The use of a word or phrase to describe, or represent, something else.

 

Motto: A brief statement to express a principle, goal, or ideal.

 

Noble Rabbit Truths: Rabbit values, virtues, truths and wisdom of The Kingdom Leporidae.

 

Royal Rabbit Day: The day Prince Hare was crowned the king!      

 

The Golden Carrot: The root of all values, virtues, truths, and wisdom (Noble Rabbit Truths) in The Kingdom Leporidae. 

 

The Carrot Oath & Royal Rabbit Creed: Declaration: "I swear to every bun (everyone), as long as I shall live. I always will pursue the truth and unto others give: Liberty and life, to those who just deserve, and keep within our kingdom fresh veggies on reserve."

 

Tricorn or Tricorne: A three-cornered hat popular during the late 17th & 18th centuries.

 

 

Themes & Symbolism:

 

 

  • The Golden Carrot: The root of all values, truths, and wisdom in The Kingdom Leporidae. "The Golden Carrot" sprouts emerald clusters, which are a symbol of hope; love; reason; and wisdom: The essence of King Hare and The Kingdom Leporidae.

 

  • The Scepter: The "jewel upon the scepter" emits a pure sheen from the brightest carrot, the world had ever seen! Lights darkness with hope, inspiration, love, kindness, compassion, joy, .etc.